Property Tax

Yuma Sun
Saturday, October 13, 2007
James Gilbert
The large increase many Yuma County residents are seeing on their 2007 property tax statement is the result of a combination of increased home valuation from two years ago and having to pay more for voter-approved bond measures, according to county officials.
East Valley Tribune
Sunday, August 12, 2007
Editorial
There’s been some buzz this summer among low-tax advocates about a pair of ballot initiative drives intended to stop large increases in property taxes. Both proposed amendments to the state constitution are sponsored by a group based in Mohave County called Arizona Tax Revolt.
East Valley Tribune
Wednesday, August 8, 2007
Editorial
There’s been some buzz this summer among low-tax advocates about a pair of ballot initiative drives intended to stop large increases in property taxes. Both proposed amendments to the state constitution are sponsored by a group based in Mohave County called Arizona Tax Revolt.
The Arizona Republic
Friday, August 3, 2007
Bob Schuster
If you're a homeowner, you'd better brace yourself. You'll be getting your property-tax bill soon. And it will be higher than last year's. In many cases, much higher. So high, in fact, that it might prompt you to join Arizona's fledgling tax revolt. At least two initiatives are being proposed that would prohibit local taxing entities from reaping windfalls when property valuations soar, as has happened in Maricopa County the past few years.
The Arizona Republic
Thursday, July 26, 2007
Mary Jo Pitzl
Remember your property-tax bill for 2003? Marc Goldstone wants you to not only remember it, but to live with it, essentially, for as long as the property stands. On Wednesday, the chairman of Arizona Tax Revolt filed an initiative for the November 2008 ballot that would roll back valuations on all properties statewide to 2003 levels. Tax bills are computed on a property's valuation.
Capitol Times
Friday, July 13, 2007
Luige del Puerto
A movement is underway to roll back levies of taxing entities to levels of two years ago, one of several efforts in Arizona in recent years aimed at shielding property owners from tax hikes.
East Valley Tribune
Friday, July 6, 2007
Beth Lucas
Gilbert Councilman Dave Crozier wants the Town Council to reconsider the town’s recently approved property tax rate — in light of proposed statewide initiatives that would retroactively force governments to decrease tax hikes.
East Valley Tribune
Saturday, June 30, 2007
Kevin McCarthy Editorial
With few exceptions, the seeds of property tax revolts are sown when elected officials demonstrate that they cannot be trusted with the extraordinary power granted to them through an ad valorem (valuation-based) property tax system. That demonstration was clearly on display at the recent Gilbert Town Council hearing to set the 2007 property tax rate.
West Valley View
Friday, June 29, 2007
Rebecca I. Allen
The numbers can give tax-paying homeowners a case of rate shock. Several West Valley school districts published truth in taxation notices in today's View announcing minor to seemingly excessive jumps in primary property tax rates.
Arizona Daily Star
Monday, March 26, 2007
Senate President Tim Bee
Property taxpayers across Arizona are alarmed. They have been receiving notification from county assessors across the state that the taxable value of their property is again increasing. Their anxiety is certainly justified because experience tells them that increases in assessed value will translate into higher property taxes when local governments set their budgets.

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