Property Tax

The Arizona Republic
Wednesday, June 18, 2008
Mary Jo Pitzl
A tax break for an entertainment district south of Chase Field. Tax credits for manufacturers of solar components. Incentives that could lead to a new baseball stadium in Tucson. Together, these could create jobs necessary to revive Arizona's sagging economy, some Arizona lawmakers believe. They unveiled their plan Tuesday and hope to push it through the Legislature during the final two weeks of the session.
East Valley Tribune
Thursday, June 5, 2008
Jason Massad
The primary tax rate for Pinal County property owners would drop to the lowest level in 30 years under a tentative budget approved by county officials. The tax paid this fiscal year to the county on a home valued at $100,000 was about $402. In the upcoming fiscal year, which begins July 1, the tax on a house valued at $100,000 would be about $344.
East Valley Tribune
Wednesday, June 4, 2008
Sarah J. Boggan
Queen Creek property owners will pay higher tax bills this year based on increased assessed property values despite a declining housing market. Voters approved the town's first-ever primary property tax of $1.95 per $100 of assessed valuation last year to fund the start-up Queen Creek Fire Department and the town's contract with Maricopa County Sheriff's Office.
The Herald
Wednesday, April 9, 2008
Howard Fischer
PHOENIX — Arizona lawmakers voted Tuesday to prevent the return of a suspended property tax. The 16-14 Senate vote to repeal the levy came over the objections of two Republicans who chided colleagues for renouncing future revenues even before they know how they will finance the state’s needs.
The Arizona Republic
Saturday, December 29, 2007
Glen Creno
Valley homeowners upset about the fast rise in their property-tax assessments may feel some relief this year as the latest valuation notices hit their mailboxes.
Arizona Capitol Times
Friday, December 7, 2007
Luige del Puerto
A group seeking changes in Arizona’s tax system through a ballot initiative has printed 15,000 copies each of its two petitions and distributed most of them to its coordinators, according to initiative organizer Marc Goldstone. Volunteers of the Arizona Tax Revolt have begun collecting signatures in their neighborhoods, but few are stationed in front of stores because of the heat, Goldstone said.
The Indianapolis Star
Monday, November 19, 2007
Mary Beth Schneider and Bill Ruthhart
Indiana legislators return to the Statehouse on Tuesday to find a way to permanently cut property taxes without strangling essential government services. If they're successful, Indiana could be the first state to come up with an answer to the problem of rising property taxes and the rising costs facing government -- issues every state is struggling to address.
Arizona Capitol Times
Wednesday, November 7, 2007
Yellow Sheets Report
Kevin McCarthy, President of the Arizona Tax Research Association, said his rough estimate is that the initiative proposed by Prop 13 Arizona will cut real property taxes by half.
The Arizona Republic
Wednesday, November 7, 2007
Ofelia Madrid and Meghan Moravcik
More than half the 22 school districts that were asking voters for additional money were stunned Tuesday by a possible taxpayer backlash after voters rejected budget overrides to keep class sizes low and pay teacher salaries. A majority of the school districts were asking for the continuation of budget overrides that have been in place for more than 20 years and were expected to keep the tax rate the same. Overrides are considered for approval by voters every seven years.
The Arizona Republic
Tuesday, November 6, 2007
Matthew Benson
Hoping to capitalize on homeowners' angst over rising property-tax bills, another citizens group is targeting the tax with a Proposition 13-style initiative planned for the 2008 state ballot. Calling itself Prop 13 Arizona, the group filed language Monday for an initiative modeled after its California namesake. The measure would roll back property valuations, for tax purposes, and institute strict limits on future value increases and tax bills.


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