Miscellaneous

Arizona Capitol Times
Tuesday, July 19, 2011
Caitlyn Coakley
“It’s not fair,” said Gayle Shanks. As the owner of Changing Hands bookstore in Tempe, Shanks is upset that her company cannot compete with Amazon. Not because the giant online retailer is able to price their products lower, she said, but because the Internet giant’s business model gives it a 10 percent advantage over her at checkout.
The Arizona Republic
Saturday, September 19, 2009
Mary Jo Pitzl
Kirk Adams ran for House speaker on a platform of transparency and reform of the legislative process. The pitch worked: He ousted a veteran lawmaker last fall in a closed-door Republican caucus meeting. But Adams' ability to enact his agenda has not worked as effectively - or as quickly. Living up to the promises in Adams' "Rebuilding Our Republican Majority" strategy handbook has proved difficult.
The Arizona Republic
Friday, September 18, 2009
Mary Jo Pitzl
The Senate was the emblem of dysfunctional state government during the Legislature's drawn-out and unsuccessful struggle to pass a balanced budget. In the end, after more than 200 days in session, the chamber couldn't pass a plan that Gov. Jan Brewer would accept. And Bob Burns, as Senate president, bore the brunt of the blame.
The Arizona Republic
Sunday, May 10, 2009
Robert Robb
From the political notebook: • Within the spending lobby, there is no more firmly held belief than that Arizona is an inexcusably low-tax state. The basis for this belief is a report on state and local tax collections from the Census Bureau. For 2006, the most recent year for which figures are available, Arizona ranked 39th among the states in tax collections per capita. Hence the conclusion that, compared with other states, Arizona is among the bottom dwellers.
Arizona Capitol Times
Thursday, March 12, 2009
Christian Palmer
State programs that receive revenue from the sale of tobacco are expected to see collections dwindle after a federal tobacco tax takes hold on April 1.
Tucson Citizen
Friday, November 30, 2007
Heidi Rowley
Sales of cigarettes in Arizona have fallen by millions of packs since voters approved a big tobacco tax increase and a ban on smoking in bars a year ago Tobacco tax revenue increased $57 million in the fiscal year that ended June 30, to $345.6 million. But all of that increase, and more, went into a new fund for early childhood education. The fund received $74 million, nearly all the revenue from an 82-cent per pack increase approved by voters.
The Associated Press
Saturday, November 18, 2006
Editorial
PHOENIX - Key Republican lawmakers said Friday they have no intention to bow to Democratic Gov. Janet Napolitano's agenda, despite her statements that her big re-election win gives her a mandate. And one top Republican leader said illegal immigration, an issue that saw GOP lawmakers and the governor battle nearly the entire 2006 session, will again be prominent on GOP lawmakers' to-do list in 2007.
The Arizona Republic
Wednesday, October 25, 2006
Mary Jo Pitzl
Early-childhood-education and health programs on next month's ballot could lose millions of dollars if a misplaced decimal point is interpreted technically. Proposition 203 is built around an 80-cent-per-pack tax increase on cigarettes to pay for the programs. But the ballot language calls for an ".80 cent/pack" tax increase, or 1/100th of what backers say they intended. That's less than 1 cent per pack.
The Arizona Republic
Wednesday, October 25, 2006
Laurie Roberts
Of all the oddball ideas on next month's ballot - and there are a bunch - none is more bizarre than Proposition 203. Or sadly, more of a sure thing. Proposition 203 is like pitting Pee-wee Herman against the Terminator, like calling up a tee-baller to pitch to Barry Bonds. Like inviting a leper to run against the Gerber baby.
The Arizona Republic
Friday, September 29, 2006
Kevin McCarthy
The process of "ballot-box budgeting," where special-interest groups sidestep the state budget process to earmark taxes for their pet projects, has been much abused in Arizona. This year's effort comes in the form of Proposition 203, an initiative that calls for a dramatic 68 percent increase in tobacco taxes.

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